LichenIreland
  • Porina hibernica P.James & Swinscow
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Porina hibernica
© Robert Thompson
Porina hibernica
© Robert Thompson
Porina hibernica
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(Map updated: 11 August 2009)
 

Porina hibernica grows on old oak bark in ancient afforested or former parkland areas and is distinguished by its bright, orange-brown (greener in shade) crust of richly branched, coral-like isidia. The spherical discs (perithecia) containing the 12- to 16-septate spores can be up to three-quarters immersed in the bark, so need to be dug out with a razor blade and squashed. The species is usually easy to identify when sterile. The structured isidia of this species is quite different from soft-textured, filamentous bark algae such as Trentepohlia. West and south-west Ireland.

Key characteristics

  • Exclusive to ancient oak tree bark; thallus of orange-brown cylindrical isidia; black, partly sunken perithecia may be present
  • The related Porina coralloidea has a similar thallus structure but it is always a dull, blackish grey; Porina rosei has similar coloured isidia but these are aggregated into mound-like clusters.

Original text submitted by Vince J. Giavarini

 
 Simms, M. J., (2016). Porina hibernica P.James & Swinscow. [In] LichenIreland.
http://www.habitas.org.uk/lichenireland/species.asp?item=19893 Accessed on 2018-10-22.