LichenIreland
  • Lobaria amplissima (Scop.) Forssell
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Lobaria amplissima
© Robert Thompson
Lobaria amplissima
© Robert Thompson
Lobaria amplissima
© Robert Thompson
Lobaria amplissima
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(Map updated: 11 August 2009)
 

Among all the four ‘lungwort’ lichens, L. amplissima is the rarest. It forms large, robust, foliose patches that are grey-white when dry and greener when wet, sometimes even exceeding 30cm diam. The large, wavy lobes have neatly notched margins. It may often be found with shrub-like outgrowths called cephalodia (amusingly referred to as ‘cabbages’ by lichenologists), otherwise called Dendriscocaulon umhausense when they occur independently. L. amplissima is a species of old woodland. Most recent sightings were from Counties Wicklow and Kerry. Previously, it had a more widespread distribution that included Counties Mayo, Cork and Antrim.

Key characteristics

  • Dinner-plate-sized species with a pale thallus and notched, neatly rounded lobe margins; often there are densely branched shrubby outgrowths called cephalodia (‘cabbages’) present
  • On trunks and boughs of old, mature trees such as oak, ash and sycamore; oceanic areas; mainly western.

Original text submitted by Vince J. Giavarini

 
 Simms, M. J., (2016). Lobaria amplissima (Scop.) Forssell. [In] LichenIreland.
http://www.habitas.org.uk/lichenireland/species.asp?item=19310 Accessed on 2018-12-12.