LichenIreland
  • Stereocaulon vesuvianum Pers.
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Stereocaulon vesuvianum
© Mike Simms
Stereocaulon vesuvianum
© Mike Simms
Stereocaulon vesuvianum
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(Map updated: 11 August 2009)
 

This loosely branching, light grey, cushion-forming (to 5cm high), rock and soil-inhabiting lichen is a common sight in upland areas. In Stereocaulon stems (pseudopodetia) support a grey mass of coral-like branches called phyllocladia. In S. vesuvianum the phyllocladia are tiny, rounded, lobed scales with dark-grey spotted centres. This distinguishes it from similar species. It grows widely on and among well-illuminated siliceous rocks. Discs are relatively common. Throughout Ireland.

Key characteristics

  • Grey, coral-like and extensively cushion-forming; it is a major component of upland lichen communities on acid rocks; easily recognised by the dark-grey centres on the small, scale-like lobes
  • An upright species, not flattened or arching.

Original text submitted by Vince J. Giavarini

 
 Simms, M. J., (2016). Stereocaulon vesuvianum Pers.. [In] LichenIreland.
http://www.habitas.org.uk/lichenireland/species.asp?item=19067 Accessed on 2018-10-20.