LichenIreland
  • Evernia prunastri (L.) Ach.
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Evernia prunastri
© Robert Thompson
Evernia prunastri
© Robert Thompson
Evernia prunastri
© Robert Thompson
Evernia prunastri
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(Map updated: 11 August 2009)
Evernia prunastri
© Mike Simms
 

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Known as ‘oak moss’ and widely harvested on the continent for use in the perfume industry, this familiar lichen forms yellow-green to grey, ragged, hanging tufts about the length of a little finger. The antler-shaped branches are flattened, strap-like and white below. Mature lobes are edged with spots of powdery-white soredia (a mixture of fungal hyphae and algae). The whole plant is anchored by a holdfast-like sheath. Frequent on acid-barked trees and old wooden fencing; rare on rocks.

Key characteristics

  • Upper surface yellow-green but white below
  • The broadly flattened branches form hanging tufts.

Original text submitted by Vince J. Giavarini

 Simms, M. J., (2016). Evernia prunastri (L.) Ach.. [In] LichenIreland.
http://www.habitas.org.uk/lichenireland/species.asp?item=18480 Accessed on 2017-12-14.