Flora of Northern Ireland
Leontodon autumnalis
© Graham Day
Leontodon autumnalis
© Graham Day
Leontodon autumnalis
(Map updated: March 2008)
 

A late-summer/autumn flowering perennial with a rosette of deeply-lobed, somewhat dandelion-like, leaves, and yellow flowering heads which are also something like those of dandelions. (But dandelions have unbranched scapes, whereas autumnal hawkbit has usually branched scapes and two or more flower-heads.)

It is very common in a variety of grassy places such as meadows, pastures and roadside verges.

The only other common yellow-flowered composite with which this could be confused is the common cat's-ear (Hypochaeris radicata) which is distinguished by its bristly and less deeply lobed leaves.

Forms of autumnal hawkbit with very hairy flower bracts and unbranched scapes are quite frequent along the north coast and are frequently mistaken for the rough hawkbit (Leontodon hispidus), but that species is not found in Northern Ireland.

All names: Leontodon autumnalis L.